The moment you want to be an anti-vaxxer

“What is the worst case scenario as a doctor?” –at some point, one of my faculty in school asked us this question– “It’s when your patient was asymptomatic before they saw you, and after accepting treatment you said they needed, now they’ve developed symptoms and are in pain.”

Now that I’ve practiced for a few years, can confirm: this is the worst.

And this is unfortunately exactly what happens a lot of the time with vaccines.

Continue reading
Advertisements

The Cost of Unity

Now is not a unified moment in the life of the nation, and it shows. The congressional district where my mom lives, and where I’m spending my maternity leave, is still covered with signs leftover from Midterms. It flipped from decades of red (including names like Newt Gingrich and Tom Price) to blue, but by less than a percentage point. In the district next door, the winner still hasn’t been officially called and the two candidates are separated by only around 500 votes.

Now is also not a unified moment in the life of the church. 75% of white evangelicals voted Republican in the Midterms. Meanwhile, almost all of my Christian friends, most of whom would formally fit the definition of an “evangelical” even if they might not like that label, voted D down the ballot.

Continue reading

Fear and Trembling

Before I left Boston I would think with longing of the beginning of my maternity leave: baby still inside my belly (and therefore silent and automatically fed!), a minimum of daily obligations, temperate weather, family, fall foliage…

Though I tried not to, these dreams of lazy days made me less motivated in my last few weeks in Boston. I got a kind of ministry senioritis. After five and a half uninterrupted years of some kind of leadership role–school fellowship, small group, diaconate, you name it–I was more than ready for a break and ended up decelerating into it rather than trying to finish strong.

As for these last few weeks–they’ve been every bit as lazy as I had hoped and dreamed. But this past Sunday I experienced a needed interruption. Continue reading

Let us consider…

On this side of heaven, every community we experience, no matter how tightly-knit, is temporary. People move on both in terms of geography and life stage; especially in a city like Boston, three or four years with the same group of friends is hard to come by.

In fact, it’s reasonable to expect that the joy of close fellowship will soon be followed by the loneliness of transition–aching for friendship to come while missing community past. Continue reading

Q & A for 17 Going on 18

“the end of a year is like the end of…life…in these last hours, the lifetime of this year passes before my eyes, and I face the inevitable question: Did I live it well?”

This is from the John Piper’s Solid Joys Devotional for December 31st. He goes on to note with encouragement that unlike our actual deaths, the next morning we will have a fresh slate to take all the insights of our “death” to make the next year better.

Continue reading

Permission to Impost

“Imposter” is one of those funny words that doesn’t have the root it should. If “shopper” is one who shops and “reader” is one who reads, shouldn’t “imposter” be one who imposts?

But of course, impost isn’t a word, and in that regard the very word imposter is a fake among others like it.

Imposter is also what I’ve felt a lot like recently. Continue reading

Fidget Spinner

I’m nearing the end of a weeklong stay in California with my dad, stepmom, and 9-year-old brother. My brother has his first swim meet this Saturday. Even though he can swim 50m in around 30s (if he’s rested, he says), he was reluctant to sign up–he says he likes to swim “just for fun.”  I was taken aback. Continue reading