The Cost of Unity

Now is not a unified moment in the life of the nation, and it shows. The congressional district where my mom lives, and where I’m spending my maternity leave, is still covered with signs leftover from Midterms. It flipped from decades of red (including names like Newt Gingrich and Tom Price) to blue, but by less than a percentage point. In the district next door, the winner still hasn’t been officially called and the two candidates are separated by only around 500 votes.

Now is also not a unified moment in the life of the church. 75% of white evangelicals voted Republican in the Midterms. Meanwhile, almost all of my Christian friends, most of whom would formally fit the definition of an “evangelical” even if they might not like that label, voted D down the ballot.

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Fear and Trembling

Before I left Boston I would think with longing of the beginning of my maternity leave: baby still inside my belly (and therefore silent and automatically fed!), a minimum of daily obligations, temperate weather, family, fall foliage…

Though I tried not to, these dreams of lazy days made me less motivated in my last few weeks in Boston. I got a kind of ministry senioritis. After five and a half uninterrupted years of some kind of leadership role–school fellowship, small group, diaconate, you name it–I was more than ready for a break and ended up decelerating into it rather than trying to finish strong.

As for these last few weeks–they’ve been every bit as lazy as I had hoped and dreamed. But this past Sunday I experienced a needed interruption. Continue reading

Permission to Impost

“Imposter” is one of those funny words that doesn’t have the root it should. If “shopper” is one who shops and “reader” is one who reads, shouldn’t “imposter” be one who imposts?

But of course, impost isn’t a word, and in that regard the very word imposter is a fake among others like it.

Imposter is also what I’ve felt a lot like recently. Continue reading

Trumpcare is anti-Christian

In five days, the Senate is poised to vote on the Better Care Reconciliation Act, its version of a bill to repeal and replace the ACA. It’s no secret that healthcare in the U.S. is the most expensive in the developed world and delivers poor quality for its high pricetag. We live in a messy democracy, and this is a messy issue, so it’s not a surprise that the laws on the books now are a mess and any future laws will also be a mess.

Nevertheless, I’m 100% against the BCRA and its House counterpart as ways to address the problems of American healthcare, even though as a healthcare provider and a taxpayer I’ve seen firsthand the flaws of what we have now, because what trumps those two identities ultimately is my identity as a Christian. Continue reading

This Election is Making me Scared to Move to the South

As America’s been trying to figure out how to make its Big Decision of 2016, hubby and I have been trying to make our own big decision–whether to uproot ourselves from Boston, where we both went to school, to return to the place both our parents call home–Atlanta, Georgia. We’ve been trying to take into account everything from his job to my job to family planning to cost of living to community and church involvement.

These last two points are the ones being assaulted by this election. Continue reading